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Briggs commends A Possible Cure for Heart Failure

Miles Briggs, Scottish Conservative and Unionist MSP for Lothian, is welcoming the discovery of a potential treatment to prevent deadly muscle scarring that contributes to chronic heart failure, by scientists at the University of Edinburgh. The research team have discovered that a new experimental drug can block molecules called alpha V integrins, that are found on the surface of scar-forming cells, and reduce scarring following heart of skeletal muscle injury. Scarring happens naturally after tissue injury, but in excess it can stop muscles from working effectively.  Excessive scarring, known as fibrosis, can occur in cardiac muscles during chronic heart failure, making the heart muscle less able to contract properly and pump blood around the body.  Miles has tabled a congratulatory motion on the subject this morning in Parliament.

 

Commenting today Miles said:

 

“I congratulate the research team, led by the University of Edinburgh, on their development of a potential treatment to prevent deadly muscle scarring that contributes to chronic heart failure.  If successful this treatment could significantly reduce that amount of deaths from heart related issues, for millions of Scottish citizens, as well as other citizens in countries all over the world.

 

“ I thank the Wellcome Trust and the British Heart Foundation on their support for the study, as well as the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh for contributing funding towards the study.”

 

ENDs……..

 

  • Please find below a copy of the motion tabled by Miles today, 24th October 2017.
  • For any further information, please contact Miles’ office on 0131 348 5945
  •  

Motion Number: S5M-08379
Lodged By: Miles Briggs
Date Lodged: 24/10/2017

Title: Potential Heart Failure Therapy Breakthrough

Motion Text:

That the Parliament welcomes the news that scientists at the University of Edinburgh, which it considers is a world-class research institute, have discovered a potential treatment to prevent deadly muscle scarring; understands that the treatment works by targeting molecules on the surface of scar-forming cells, which are called alpha V integrins, blocking these molecules with a new experimental drug to help reduce scarring following heart or skeletal muscle injury; recognises that the prevention of scarring on heart tissue could significantly reduce chronic heart failure; acknowledges that the study, published in Nature Communications, was supported by the Wellcome Trust and the British Heart Foundation and also that funding was received from the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh,  congratulates all those involved in the research and considers that this research is important and valuable in the advancement of preventative medicine.

Miles Briggs